Increased heart rate:


What is heart rate?
Very simply, your heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per minute. You can measure your heart rate by feeling your pulse - the rhythmic expansion and contraction (or throbbing) of an artery as blood is forced through it by the regular contractions of the heart. It is a measure of how hard your heart is working. Your pulse can be felt at the wrist, neck, groin or top of the foot - areas where the artery is close to the skin. Most commonly, people measure their pulse in their wrist. This is called the radial pulse.

Increased heart rate good or bad:

The cardiovascular fitness inevitably includes discussions of heart rate and the need for individuals to increase theirs to the all-important training zone. However, while experts encourage us to increase our heart rates during aerobic exercise, they are also quick to warn of the dangers associated with a resting heart rate that is too high. Sound contradictory? Actually, there are sound physiological reasons why an increased heart rate is advantageous during exercise yet undesirable when the body is at rest. While you exercise, your heart beats faster to pump more blood (which contains important oxygen, fluids and nutrients) to the working muscles. High resting heart rate (more than 85 beats per minute), on the other hand, often indicates medical problems, such as a weak heart that is struggling to do its job or thyroid complications. If you have a high resting heart rate, exercise may be a practical prescription. However, you should always check with your physician before beginning an exercise program. It should be noted that feelings of a fast or irregular heartbeat could be brought on through excessive use of caffeine or alcohol and/or smoking. Should you experience any symptoms related to a fast heartbeat or palpitation, especially if associated with a feeling of faintness, medical advice should be sought. In strengthening your heart muscle, aerobic exercise trains your heart to pump more blood with every stroke increasing your cardiac output up to eight times its resting capacity. Ultimately, your heart becomes more efficient at delivering oxygen and draining metabolic waste products away. Best of all, this improved efficiency is sustained even after exercise, translating into a lower resting heart rate.

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Heart rate monitor watches:
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Increased heart rate:
What is heart rate? Very simply, your heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per minute. You can measure your heart rate by feeling your pulse - the rhythmic expansion and contraction (or throbbing) of an artery as blood is forced...

Heart Rate
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