High heart rate:


The heart rate is a term used to describe the frequency of the cardiac cycle. It is considered one of the four vital signs. Usually it is calculated as the number of contractions (heart beats) of the heart in one minute and expressed as "beats per minute" (bpm). Heart for information on embryo fetal heart rates. When resting, the adult human heart beats at about 70 bpm (males) and 75 bpm (females), but this rate varies between people. However, the reference range is nominally between 60 bpm (if less termed bradycardia) and 100 bpm (if greater, termed tachycardia). The Resting heart rates can be significantly lower in athletes, and significantly higher in the obese.
The body can increase the heart rate in response to a wide variety of conditions in order to increase the cardiac output (the amount of blood ejected by the heart per unit time). Exercise, environmental stressors or psychological stress can cause the heart rate to increase above the resting rate. The pulse is the most straightforward way of measuring the heart rate, but it can be deceptive when some strokes do not lead to much cardiac output. In these cases (as happens in some arrhythmias), the heart rate may be considerably higher than the pulse.

Heart rate variability

Heart rate variability is the variation of beat-to-beat intervals. A healthy heart has a large HRV, while decreased or absent variability may indicate cardiac disease. HRV also decreases with exercise-induced tachycardia. The One aspect of the heart rate variability can be used as a measurement of fitness, specifically the speed at which one's heart rate drops upon termination of vigorous exercise. The speed, at which a person's heart rate which returns to resting, is faster for a fit person than an unfit person. A drop of 20 beats in a minute is typical for a healthy person.

Heart rate abnormalities:

Tachycardia
The Tachycardia is a resting heart rate more than 101 beats per minute.
Bradycardia
The Bradycardia is defined as a heart rate less than 60 beats per minute although it is seldom symptomatic until below 50 bpm. Trained athletes tend to have slow resting heart rates, and resting bradycardia in athletes should not be considered abnormal if the individual has no symptoms associated with it.

Heart rate monitor:
The heart rate monitor is a component or a device that permits a user to scrutinize or monitor their heart rate whilst exercising. It generally consists of two elements, a chest strap and a wrist receiver. The wrist receiver usually doubles as a...

Ideal heart rate:
Any of the exercise that increases your heart rate will burn calories and increase your metabolism. But, if you really want to know then let us do the work for you. We should exercise properly for the heart rate. Nowadays in the gym also they have...

Increased heart rate:
What is heart rate? Very simply, your heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per minute. You can measure your heart rate by feeling your pulse - the rhythmic expansion and contraction (or throbbing) of an artery as blood is forced...

Heart Rate
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