Hearing protection


Ear is a vertebrate organ of hearing, responsible for maintaining equilibrium as well as sensing sound and divided in mammals into the external ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear. The ear has three main parts: the outer, middle, and inner ear. The outer ear opens into the ear canal. The eardrum separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Small bones in the middle ear help transfer sound to the inner ear. The inner ear contains the auditory nerve, which leads to the brain. Any source of sound sends vibrations or sound waves into the air. These funnel through the ear opening, down the ear canal, and strike your eardrum, causing it to vibrate. The vibrations are passed to the small bones of the middle ear, which transmit them to the hearing nerve in the inner ear. Here, the vibrations become nerve impulses and go directly to the brain, which interprets the impulses as sound: music, a slamming door, a voice, etc. When noise is too loud, it begins to kill the nerve endings in the inner ear. As the exposure time to loud noise increases, more and more nerve endings are destroyed. As the number of nerve endings decreases, so does your hearing. There is no way to restore life to dead nerve endings; the damage is permanent.

Noise

Noise can be dangerous for our ears. If it is loud enough and lasts long enough, it can damage the hearing. The damage caused by noise is called sensorineural hearing loss or nerve deafness, can be caused by several factors other than noise, but noise-induced hearing loss is different in one important way, it can be reduced or prevented altogether. People differ in their sensitivity to noise. As a general rule, noise may damage your hearing if you have to shout over background noise to make yourself heard, the noise hurts your ears, it makes your ears ring, or you have difficulty hearing for several hours after exposure to the noise. Sound can be measured scientifically in two ways. Intensity, or loudness of sound, is measured in decibels. Pitch is measured in frequency of sound vibrations per second. A low pitch, such as a deep voice or a tuba, makes fewer vibrations per second than a high voice or violin.

Hearing protectors

One must wear hearing protectors in an excessively noisy environment. One should also wear them when using power tools, noisy yard equipment, or firemans, or riding a motorcycle or snowmobile.

Hearing-impaired children
The terms 'hard of hearing', 'deaf' and 'hearing impaired' cover a wide range of conditions, which affect a child's listening ability and often their educational and social development. There are two types of hearing loss prevalent. Firstly,...

Hearing-impaired telephone
Phoning in an order for a pepperoni pizza can be a cumbersome process for a deaf person, but new telecommunications services may deliver a better way. Now consider making a telephone call to your mother. You pick up the phone, dial the number and...

Phonak hearing aids
The Phonak programmable hearing aids are available in behind- the-ear and in-the-ear versions. The Phonak programmable hearing aids are delivered with a remote control, which allows the user access to three memories (one for "quiet" listening;...

Hearing
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