Headache medicine


The over-the-counter and prescription medications that are used to treat migraine pain fall into two general categories: those for use during an attack and those that help prevent attacks. A sufferer may need to take different medications to address distinct symptoms. For example, some drugs can help relieve the nausea and vomiting, while others may ease the head pain.
Recent news about the safety and efficacy of cox-2 inhibitors and other pain medications has raised concerns about taking some prescription drugs for headaches, with 19 percent of headache sufferers reducing their dosage of headache medication or discontinuing their use altogether, according to a new survey sponsored by the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain, whose members are specially trained in the treatment of headaches and face pain.

About the AACFP

The AACFP Craniofacial Pain Survey (CFPS) also found that among those taking prescription drugs for their headaches, narcotic analgesics are most common, with 88 percent of prescription users also taking OTC medications for their headaches. People with the most frequent headaches are twice as likely as less frequent sufferers to combat their problem with prescription drugs. Because muscles and joints of the head and face are often overlooked as a source of headaches, it's not surprising that patients are still suffering despite all these medications. Impact of Headache on Family, Work The survey also found that headaches have a significant impact on family, social and work life, especially greatest among those with frequent headaches.


Conclusion

Fully three-quarters of Americans with weekly headaches admit their social or family life or work suffers in a variety of ways. In fact, almost half of those with weekly headaches say their condition keeps them from working to their potential. Isometheptene, dichloralphenazone, and acetaminophen combination is used to treat certain kinds of headaches, such as tension headaches and migraine headaches. This combination is not used regularly to prevent headaches. It should be taken only after headache pain begins, or after a warning sign that a migraine is coming appears. Isometheptene helps to relieve throbbing headaches, but it is not an ordinary pain reliever. Dichloralphenazone helps you to relax, and acetaminophen relieves pain.

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Headache Types
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