Frequent headaches


Headaches are a common cause of suffering, but all headaches are not created equal. The main challenge to affording relief from various forms of cephalgia, or head pain, is categorizing a headache by type, and then proceeding with the therapy most likely to help. The International Headache Society's landmark work on headache classification has allowed important advances in headache study, but is somewhat awkward to use in clinical practice. One practical approach is to first distinguish urgent headaches from others that may be less urgent, if no less distressing. Identifying special headaches i.e. those that may only benefit from specific therapy is the next step. Finally, if neither of these classifications fit, treatment of tension or migraine headache is in order. A headache is pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck. Serious causes of headaches are extremely rare. Most people with headaches can feel much better by making lifestyle changes, learning ways to relax, and occasionally by taking medications.

Causes of frequent headaches

Tension headaches are due to tight contracted muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp, and jaw. They are often related to stress, depression, or anxiety. Overworking, not getting enough sleep, missing meals, and using alcohol or street drugs can make you more susceptible to them. Headaches can be triggered by chocolate, cheese, and monosodium glutamate. People who drink caffeine can have headaches when they don't get their usual daily amount. Tension headaches tend to be on both sides of your head. They often start at the back of your head and spread forward. The pain may feel dull or squeezing, like a tight band or vice. Your shoulders, neck, or jaw may feel tight and sore.

Symptoms of frequent headaches

Frequent headaches are severe, recurrent headaches generally accompanied by other symptoms like visual disturbances or nausea. They tend to begin on one side of your head, although the pain may spread to both sides. You may have an aura and feel throbbing, pounding, or pulsating pain.Treatment involves a step-wise approach, beginning with over-the-counter non-steroidal medications or acetaminophen, followed by prescription-strength doses when necessary. Worse headaches may require migraine-type medications, such as Midrin. Medications containing caffeine or butalbital are sometimes used though risk of rebound headache increases. Prophylactic treatments similar to those used for migraine may be useful.

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Headache Types
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