What are the first aid procedures to treat a laceration


lacerated, including subcutaneous fat, tendon, muscle, or bone. Laceration describes a wound involving penetration of the skin, in which the injury is deeper than the superficial skin level. Most lacerations should be evaluated by a doctor. First, the physician will need to check for deep structure involvement, such as a tendon laceration. Second, the injury will need to be properly irrigated and cleaned. Third, stitches or other advanced closure methods are often needed. Do not delay in seeking urgent treatment. Delay may result in infection or permanent scarring. In addition, if you haven't received a Tetanus vaccine in the last ten years, a booster will be required.
Treatment:
A laceration should be repaired in the following conditions. If laceration continues to bleed and the cut is more than one-eighth to one-fourth inch deep. If it exposes fat, muscle, tendon, or bone and causes a change in function surrounding the area of the laceration. Lacerations are less likely to become contaminated if they are repaired soon after they happen. Many doctors will not repair a laceration that is more than eight hours old because the threat of infection is too great. Laceration mends a tear in the skin or other tissue. The process is similar to repairing a tear in clothing. Primary care physicians, emergency room physicians, and surgeons usually mend lacerations. Goals of laceration repair are to stop bleeding, prevent infection, preserve function, and restore appearance. Before repairing the laceration, the doctor thoroughly examines the wound and the underlying tendons or nerves. If nerves or tendons have been hurt, a surgeon may be needed to complete the repair. The laceration is cleaned by taking out any foreign material or debris. Removing foreign objects from penetrating wounds can sometimes cause bleeding, so this type of wound must be cleaned very cautiously. The injury is then irrigated with saline solution and a disinfectant. Once it has been cleaned, the physician anesthetizes the area of the repair by injecting a local anesthetic. The physician may trim edges that are jagged or extremely uneven. Tissue that is too damaged to heal must be removed to prevent infection.
Conclusion:
The laceration is kept dry for at least 24 hours after the repair. Light bathing is generally allowed after 24 hours if it's not soaked. The doctor will provide directions for any particular wound care. Stitches are removed 3-14 days after the repair is finished. Suture removal depends on the location of the laceration and physician preference.

First aid bag
Over the years it have worked a quite a bit in the Emergency Medical Technician field. I was a California EMT 1A -D, off and on for around fifteen years. It has also worked as a Combat Life Saver in the military. The Combat Life Saver focuses on...

First Aid for Electrical Shock
Children, love sticking their little fingers anywhere and everywhere, especially into plug points and sockets. The human body is a very good conductor of electricity, and contact with a live power source can cause significant burns, or may interfere...

Outdoor first aid:
Whenever you travel in the wilderness make sure you are prepared completely with the proper equipments and training to safeguard yourself. The emergency of first aid course is designed to introduce a Systematic method of first aid for managing...

First Aid
© first-aid.tdrbizl.com 2006