First aid for blister


Blisters are fluid-filled bumps on the skin. Many unlike things may cause blisters. Some of the most important causes are burns, reactions to insect bites, chronic rubbing or trauma to the skin, and rashes from viral illnesses, such as chicken pox. Blisters are usually filled with sterile fluid although they can arise as a reaction from a skin infection. Common causes of blisters are friction and burns. If the blister isn't too painful, do everything feasible to keep it intact. Unbroken skin over a blister provides a natural barrier to bacteria and reduces the risk of infection. Cover the blister with a small adhesive bandage to shield it.
Treatment to be done:
The symptoms are, most blisters cause no pain unless they crack, exposing tender skin underneath. The burning often associated with these skin lesions is usually not really from the blisters themselves, but from the irritated skin immediately surrounding the blister. Things that should be done at home is one should not break open the blister. This can lead to a skin infection. Once the blister opens on its own, antibiotic ointment should be applied on it until it is healed. If it is practical, try to save the blister from harm with an adhesive bandage. Immediate attention of the blisters should be taken if the blisters are formed because of a burn or chemical exposure, if the blisters are within the mouth, if there is significant pain or redness associated with the blister, or if the blister is oozing pus. If the blister is giving a lot of pain, drain the fluid while leaving the overlying skin intact. It should be drained by the help of the following process. Wash your hands and the blister with lukewarm water and soap. Clean the blister with rubbing alcohol. Disinfect a clean, sharp needle by wiping it with rubbing alcohol. With the help of the needle puncture the blister. Aim for numerous spots near the blister's edge. Let the fluid drain, but leave the overlying skin in position. Apply an antibiotic ointment on the blister and cover with a bandage. Use tweezers and scissors sterilized with rubbing alcohol to cut away all the dead skin after some days. Apply more ointment on to it.
Conclusion:
Call your doctor if you see signs of infection around a blister either pus, redness, increasing pain or warm skin. To prevent a blister, use gloves, socks, a bandage or similar protective covering over the region being rubbed. You might also try attaching moleskin inside of your shoes where it might rub, such as your heels.

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