Deaf schools


Deaf schools that use sign language to communicate are called Residential Schools and Day Schools. Deaf Schools that use speech and listening to communicate is called Oral Schools. List of programs among the Residential Programs for Emotionally Disturbed Deaf Children and Adolescents serve deaf and hard of hearing youth with emotional and/or behavioral disorders. Admission requirements may vary.

More about deaf schools

The Montreal Oral School for the Deaf has always emphasized the importance of intensively stimulating hearing and speech in the child's early years. This is the optimal time for acquiring effective speech communication. Parent participation is a vital aspect of the school and is crucial to the development of the child. Parents are actively involved in the stimulation and guidance of their child from infancy to adulthood, in the support of other families in the school, and as members of the MOSD Board of Directors. The Montreal Oral School for the Deaf offers both direct and indirect intervention to hearing-impaired students according to their needs and abilities. Direct services include full-day programs, daily intervention, and itinerant services. Indirect services are offered to students on a less frequent basis. Though full integration into the child's local school is the main goal, there is also a wide range of options within MOSD for partial integration. With early diagnosis, hearing aid use (and, for some children, cochlear implants), and speech/language stimulation, the prognosis for the child's later development is markedly improved. An intensive educational program lays the foundation for later success. Over the years, an increasing number of MOSD students have completed high school and continued to post-secondary education.

Other schools concerned

The Jean Weingarten Peninsula Oral School for the Deaf, in Redwood City, California, is dedicated to meeting the educational and developmental needs of deaf and hard of hearing children and providing support to their families. The services at JWPOSD include parent-infant and preschool programs, kindergarten to second grade education on campus, and comprehensive mainstream support services through sixth grade off campus. The school was founded thirty years ago by Leahea Grammatico and nine families to provide a learning environment that maximizes the use of each child's residual hearing and promotes the development of spoken communication through an exciting, interactive, cognitive curriculum. The outstanding staff at JWPOSD brings many years of educational experience and exemplify in their daily teaching the integration of thinking, listening, and speaking for each child.
JWPOSD students develop their oral communication skills, their self-esteem, and a love of learning through small group instruction and intensive daily individual therapy which involves parents in every aspect of the child's program. "Parents as Partners" is the key to the eventual successful mainstreaming of every deaf and hard of hearing child.

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