Deaf children


It is not easy enough to identify your kid, as a deaf even if you do you cannot just understand their actions and other behaviors. Deafness in children is of different types but there are only two main types of deafness they retain. Firstly, Sensori-neural deafness, or nerve deafness as it is sometimes called, is a hearing loss in the inner ear. This usually means that the cochlea in the inner ear is not working effectively. Secondly, conductively deafness means that sound cannot pass through the outer and middle ear into the inner ear. This is often caused by blockages such as wax in the outer ear, or fluid in the middle ear (glue ear). Glue ear is a very common condition, especially in pre-school children. It is possible for children to have a combination of sensori-neural and conductive deafness. It is also possible to have a permanent conductive deafness, but this is very rare.

Different tests

There are a number of different ways of measuring hearing. The audiologist decides which tests to use. This depends on how old your child is and for which type of deafness the audiologist is testing. The tests measure how much hearing your child has, and helps to identify the type of deafness. If your child is very young, the audiologist may have to do a series of tests before they are able to give you all the information.

Degrees of deafness

There are different degrees of deafness, which are often described as mild, moderate, severe or profound. Hearing levels are often described in terms of decibels. When you next visit the hospital with your child for a hearing test, ask the audiologist to explain the results to you, and request a copy of the results to keep. It is important for you to know the level of your child's hearing, as you may be asked for this information by teachers or others working with your child. All parents on their deaf children react differently. They may experience a range of emotions when they discover that their child is deaf. Some parents may experience feelings of guilt, sadness, isolation and anger, or have a fear of being unable to cope. Some parents, who are deaf themselves, may feel happy because they and their child will share a common language and culture.

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