Deaf basketball


Basketball is a game played between two teams of five players each, the object being to throw a ball through an elevated basket on the opponent's side of a rectangular court. Players may move the ball by dribbling or passing with the hands. An inflated spherical ball is used in this game. We have heard a lot about this game and many of us actually take interest in playing this game or watching it in the television. We love to see many of the champions or the stars of this game for example like Michael Jordan. But there is a point which must have been revolving in everybody's mind that do the persons who are hearing impaired can play this game or not? But the answer to this question is yes. Those who are hearing impaired also play basketball and to help them out there are various institutions working on the same. As an impaired not only men but also women players also participate in this kind of games.

Institutes working

There are many institutes working for the deaf basketball. In fact it must be said that there are many participants who are interested in this game. The biggest thing about the basketball is that as a game it encourages a person and as the game is all about the persons who are hearing impaired so this game encourages them to live in this beautiful world. There are many institutes such as the Star North boys' basketball, then other institutes of United Kingdom, United States, Australia, South Africa and many other countries. Also these participants do extremely well.

About the New York team
The New York State School for The Deaf's basketball team captured the Eastern States Deaf Athletic Association Division II championship title - its first in 28 years. The Trojans won three consecutive games during tournament play the first weekend in March in Providence, Rhode Island. Dennis Ryan, coach and a recreation therapist at the school, said eight teams from deaf schools along the Eastern Coast competed. In the first round, the Trojans beat the Rochester team; in the semi-finals, they defeated the host school. To clinch the title, the Rome squad won by a score of 61-49 over Newark School for the Deaf in Delaware. "We're a relatively young group - mostly freshmen and sophomores," said Ryan, who said the victory was unexpected because of the team's inexperience. He attributed the win to the players' focus and intelligence. "They're a gritty, gutsy group," said the coach. "They took coaching well, understood their roles and played with a lot of heart and desire." The team consists of 10 boys ranging in ages from 14 to 18 years old. The majority of the Trojans' games during the regular season are played against non-hearing impaired teams. Ryan said his job is to prepare the teens for any situation so sign language usually is not used during the games. The win boosted morale and school spirit from the maintenance staff to the teaching assistants, said Ryan. The school will host the Eastern States tournament next year, along with defending its basketball title.

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